THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE

The Future of Medicine - Estúdio447 English Club

THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE WORKSHOP

* From 3D printing human kidneys to head transplants and testing for Parkinson’s disease with your iPhone. We will be discussing the very latest in medical advances!

WEDNESDAY NIGHT CLUB: 17/05 - 19:30h – 21:00h
LOCATION: Chez Vous (Av. Lavandisca, 395 - Moema)
DURATION: (1.5 hours per workshop)
GROUP SIZE: 6 people
PRICE: R$80 per workshop (includes a drink per workshop: wine or beer)
           
RESERVE YOUR PLACE NOW: Your place for a workshop is only guaranteed once you have paid.

 

INTRODUCTION
When we think of the future there are many big challenges and problems we face - social, economic and environmental. Often the picture doesn’t look too bright. The future of medicine, however, is one area where we should feel optimistic! We are moving into an era of data-driven, crowd sourced, participatory, genomics-based medicine. Our doctors - or their artificial intelligence replacements - will prescribe medicines or lifestyle changes based on our full medical history, holistic self, and genetic composition. The rich will have access to powerful new technologies that prolong their lives. But health for the rest of us will also be transformed as low cost solutions trickle down from the rich as well as originating out of the basements of science-geeks to become wide spread amongst the global population. Let’s have a look at just a handful of examples of the revolutionary medical advances soon to be within our reach.


3D PRINTED KIDNEY TISSUE IS HERE
3D printers can manufacture medical equipment, prostheses, or even drugs. They will also play a vital role in regenerative medicine, to create tissues with blood vessels, bone, heart valves, ear cartilage, synthetic skin, and even organs. With its increasing affordability and open source engineering, the applications for 3D printing are incredibly vast and beneficial when it comes to health.

In 2015 a biomedical company called Organovo revealed its technique for 3D printing human kidney tissue. This is an important breakthrough, but before you get too excited, the scientists developing this technology believe that the ability to print replacement organs on demand is still decades away.[1] Growing tissue is one thing, but growing an organ and integrating it into a living body is another. We may have to wait a little longer before we can order a new organ to be printed.


3D PRINTED BONES
Breaking a bone can take weeks, even months to heal. Not for much longer according to researchers at Washington State University. They have developed a hybrid material that has the same properties - the same strength and flexibility - as real bone. This material or “model” as it is called can then be placed in the body at the site of the fracture while the real bone grows up and around it like scaffolding. Once the process is complete, the model disintegrates. The entire process has already been successfully tested in rabbits. When the bone material was combined with stem cells, the natural bone grew back much faster than normal. [2]

An 83-year-old woman in Belgium became the first person to.....
 

*** THIS IS ONLY THE BEGINNING OF THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE WORKSHOP! IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO EXPERIENCE THIS CONVERSATION WORKSHOP IN FULL, WITH A GLASS OF WINE AND A FRIENDLY GROUP OF PEOPLE, THEN PLEASE CONTACT US TO FIND OUT HOW TO PARTICIPATE. 

The rest of this workshop will discuss...

  • 3D PRINTED CASTS
  • ANTI-BLEEDING GEL
  • THE BIONIC EYE
  • NANOROBOTS LIVING IN OUR BLOODSTREAM
  • SURGICAL AND HUMANOID ROBOTS THE iKNIFE
  • ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
  • DNA SEQUENCING
  • THE WORLD’S FIRST HEAD TRANSPLANT
  • TESTING PARKINSON’S DISEASE ON YOUR IPHONE
  • ROBOTIC PROSTHETIC LIMBS

VOCABULARY

  • geek: (noun) [Portuguese: nerd] - an unfashionable or socially inept person.
  • humanoid: (adjective) [Portuguese: humanoide] - having an appearance or character resembling that of a human.
  • prosthesis: (noun) [Portuguese: prótese] - an artificial body part, such as a leg, a heart, or a breast implant. - "his upper jaw was removed and a prosthesis was fitted"
  • to heal: (verb) [Portuguese: curar]  - (of a person or treatment) cause (a wound, injury, or person) to become sound or healthy again. "his concern is to heal sick people"
  • fracture: (noun) [Portuguese: fratura] - the cracking or breaking of a hard object or material. "bone density testing can predict the risk for fracture"
  • scaffolding: (noun) [Portuguese: andaimes] - a temporary structure on the outside of a building, made usually of wooden planks and metal poles, used by workers while building, repairing, or cleaning the building.
  • to disintegrate: (verb) [Portuguese: desintegrar] - break up into small parts, typically as the result of impact or decay.
  • itchy: (adjective) [Portuguese: sarnento] - having or causing an itch. "dry, itchy skin"
  • smelly: (adjective)  [Portuguese: malcheiroso] -  having a strong or unpleasant smell. "smelly feet"
  • to sever: (verb) [Portuguese: cortar] - divide by cutting or slicing, especially suddenly and forcibly. "the head was severed from the body"
  • wound: (noun) [Portuguese: ferida] - an injury to living tissue caused by a cut, blow, or other impact, typically one in which the skin is cut or broken.
  • veterinarian: (noun) [Portuguese: veterinário] - a person qualified to treat diseased or injured animals.
  • to implant: (verb) [Portuguese: implantar] - insert or fix (tissue or an artificial object) in a person's body, especially by surgery. "electrodes had been implanted in his brain"
  • augmented reality: (noun) [Portuguese: realidade aumentada] - a technology that superimposes a computer-generated image on a user's view of the real world, thus providing a composite view.
  • malignant: (adjective) [Portuguese: maligno] - (of a disease) very virulent or infectious.
  • coma: (noun) [Portuguese: coma] - a state of deep unconsciousness that lasts for a prolonged or indefinite period, caused especially by severe injury or illness. "a road crash left him in a coma"
  • flesh: (noun) [Portuguese: carne] - the soft substance consisting of muscle and fat that is found between the skin and bones of an animal or a human.
  • affordable: (adjective) [Portuguese: acessível] - inexpensive; reasonably priced.
  • spree: [Portuguese: farra] - a spell or sustained period of unrestrained activity of a particular kind. "he went on a six-month crime spree"
  • breakthrough: (noun) [Portuguese: avanço] - a sudden, dramatic, and important discovery or development.

EXTRA INFORMATION

  • regenerative medicine: is a branch of translational research in tissue engineering and molecular biology which deals with the "process of replacing, engineering or regenerating human cells, tissues or organs to restore or establish normal function".

SOURCES

VIDEO SOURCES

  1. Veti-Gel This gel stops bleeding in seconds – Tech Insider
  2. Da Vinci Robot Stitches a Grape Back Together
  3. Terminator' false arm ties shoelace and deals cards

REFERENCES

  1. Richmond, Ben (2015) “3D Printed Kidneys Tissue is here” – vice.com
  2. Doyle, Maria (2013) “The Next Big Thing In Medicine? 3D Printed Bones” Forbes
  3. Liggett, Brit (2012) “83-Year-Old Woman Gets the World’s First 3D Printed Replacement Jaw” – inhabitat.com
  4. Kinder, Lucy (2014) “3D printed cast could heal bones 40 per cent faster.” – The Telegraph
  5. Collins, Katie (2015) “Gel that can instantly stop bleeding heads to vet surgeries” Wired
  6. Lorach, Henri (2014) “The Bionic Eye” – The Scientist
  7. Knapton, Sarah (2015) “Bionic eye fitted to British pensioner in world first” – The Telegraph
  8. Zimmer, Lori (2015) “New bionic lens could give you perfect vision for the rest of your life” – inhabitat.com
  9. Marks, Paul (2006) “Optic nerve regrown with a nanofibre scaffold” - New Scientist
  10. Piesing, Mark (2014) “Medical robotics: Would you trust a robot with a scalpel?” – The Guardian
  11. Wong, Sam (2013) "Intelligent knife" tells surgeon if tissue is cancerous” – Imperial College London
  12. Gustin, Sam (2012) “IBM’s Watson Computer Heads to Wall Street for Post-Jeopardy Gig” - TIME.com
  13. Best, Jo (2015) “When your genome costs less than your iPhone: The beautiful, terrifying future of DNA sequencing” – Tech Republic
  14. Matthew Herper, (Jan 2017) “Illumina Promises To Sequence Human Genome For $100 -- But Not Quite Yet” - Forbes  
  15. Heighton, Luke (2015) “Russian man to undergo world's first full head transplant” – The Telegraph
  16. ^ Heighton, Luke (2015)
  17. ^ Heighton, Luke (2015)
  18. Little, Max (2012) “A test for Parkinson’s disease with a phone call” – TED Talks
  19. (2012) SWNS.com “Father who lost arm in work accident has bionic ‘Terminator hand’ fitted so accurate he can even TYPE”

 

© COPYRIGHT 2017 JAMES WJ SUTTON & ESTÚDIO447 ENGLISH CLUB

** SE VOCÊ GOSTARIA DE USAR O CONTEÚDO DESTE OU QUALQUER OUTRO BLOG POST/ WORKSHOP FAVOR ENTRAR EM CONTATO COM JAMES SUTTON PELO EMAIL JAMES(AT)ESTUDIO447.NET