THE ART OF LEARNING PHRASAL VERBS

THE ART OF LEARNING PHRASAL VERBS

* Phrasal verbs can be very confusing! Discover the art of learning the most useful English phrasal verbs in a simple and visual way. This workshop includes essential grammar as well as conversation questions to put your new knowledge of phrasal verbs into practice. 
 

THURSDAY: 14/12 - 19:30h – 21:00h
LOCATION: Chez Vous (Av. Lavandisca, 395 - Moema)
PRICE: R$80 (includes wine or beer)



PHRASAL VERBS CAN BE CONFUSING
One of the things my students complain about the most is phrasal verbs and for good reason. If you are not a native speaker then phrasal verbs can be very confusing! For example do you know the different meanings of these eight phrasal verbs below?

  • take apart
  • take away
  • take back
  • take down
  • take in
  • take on
  • take up
  • take over


WHY LEARN PHRASAL VERBS
Phrasal verbs are mainly used in spoken English, everyday conversations and informal texts. The more formal a conversation or text the less phrasal verbs you will find. In the English language, one word can have many different meanings. So by learning just one English word, you can often end up adding two or more to your vocabulary!

For example, a crane can be a bird with long legs or a tall machine that helps lift heavy objects. If you use it as a verb, you might be craning your neck (stretching it) to see something. Here we have just learned three new words with just one! Words like these are called homonyms. They’re spelled the same but have different meanings. Learning phrasal verbs is another way of expanding your vocabulary with words that can take on multiple meanings.


ESSENTIAL PHRASAL VERB GRAMMAR
This workshop will explain all the grammar you will need to know to fully understand phrasal verbs. 

  • WHAT IS A PHRASAL VERB?
  • THE PHRASAL VERB DICTIONARY
  • PHRASAL VERB: VERB + ADVERB
  • PHRASAL VERB: VERB + PREPOSITION
  • PHRASAL VERB: VERB + ADVERB + PREPOSITION
  • SEPARABLE PHRASAL VERBS
  • INSEPARABLE PHRASAL VERBS


THE ART OF LEARNING PHRASAL VERBS
This workshop will demonstrate a simple and effective visual technique for the 'art' of learning phrasal verbs. 

20 OF THE MOST USEFUL ENGLISH PHRASAL VERBS

  • >>> No 1. Catch on
  • >>> No 2. Hold on
  • >>> No 3. Pass out
  • >>> No 4. Run into
  • >>> No 5. Look forward to
  • >>> No 6. Watch out
  • >>> No 7. Turn out
  • >>> No 8. End up
  • >>> No 9. Keep on
  • >>> No 10. Put up with
  • >>> No 11. Catch up
  • >>> No 12. Look up
  • >>> No 13. Be into
  • >>> No 14. Turn into
  • >>> No 15 Make out
  • >>> No 16. Figure out
  • >>> No 17. Hit on
  • >>> No 18. Put off
  • >>> No 19. Plug in
  • >>> No 20. Bring up


F * * K PHRASAL VERBS
WARNING! Some people might find the language used in the final part of the workshop below offensive. If you are not interested in learning this type of English then please feel free to stop here. The word fuck is considered vulgar slang and is used only in very casual and informal language. The literal meaning of the verb ‘to fuck’ is ‘to have sex’. It is common to hear this verb used in popular culture and ‘real life’ English, therefore I believe it is useful to understand the meaning of these six phrasal verbs below even if you never choose to say them yourself. It is important to note that it is often considered lazy English when the word ‘fuck’ is used too frequently and many native speakers still find it to be very offensive and aggressive.        

  • FUCK AROUND
  • FUCK UP
  • FUCK OVER
  • FUCK WITH
  • FUCK AROUND WITH
  • FUCK OFF

 


VOCABULARY

  • to stretch: (verb) [Portuguese: esticar] – (of something soft or elastic) be made or be capable of being made longer or wider without tearing or breaking.
  • to leap: (verb) [Portuguese: pular] – jump or spring a long way, to a great height, or with great force.
  • faith: (noun) [Portuguese: fé] – complete trust or confidence in someone or something.
  • to lend: (verb) [Portuguese: emprestar] – grant to (someone) the use of (something) on the understanding that it shall be returned.
  • solely: (adverb) [Portuguese: unicamente] – not involving anyone or anything else; only.
  • ingrained: (adjective) [Portuguese: arraigado] – firmly fix or establish (a habit, belief, or attitude) in a person.
  • to stagger: (verb) [Portuguese: cambalear] – walk or move unsteadily, as if about to fall.
  • thong: (verb) [Portuguese: fio dental] – a small item of clothing that is worn between the bottom cheeks and covers a person’s intimate parts. Typically a swimsuit for women or pair of knickers.
  • to quit: (verb) [Portuguese: sair ou desistir ] – leave (a place), usually permanently or to give up.
  • to regret: (verb) [Portuguese: arrepender] – feel sad, repentant, or disappointed over (something that has happened or been done, especially a loss or missed opportunity).
  • to pass out: (phrasal verb) [Portuguese: desmaiar] - become unconscious.
  • awkward: (adjectuve) [Portuguese: embaraçoso] – causing or feeling embarrassment or inconvenience.
  • OMG (OH MY GOD): (exclamation) [Portuguese: Oh meu deus] – used to express shock, excitement, disbelief, etc..
  • wolf: (noun) [Portuguese: lobo] – a wild carnivorous mammal of the dog family, living and hunting in packs. 
  • sheep: (noun) [Portuguese: ovelha] – a domesticated ruminant animal with a thick woolly coat and (typically only in the male) curving horns. 
  • false prophet: (noun) [Portuguese: falso profeta] – is one who falsely claims the gift of prophecy or divine inspiration, or who uses that gift for evil ends.
  • huge: (adjective) [Portuguese: enorme] – extremely large; enormous.
  • journal: (noun) [Portuguese: diário] – a daily record of news and events of a personal nature; a diary.
  • proverb: (noun) [Portuguese: provérbio] – a short pithy saying in general use, stating a general truth or piece of advice.
  • annoyance: (noun) [Portuguese: aborrecimento] – the feeling or state of being annoyed; irritation.
  • oasis: (noun) [Portuguese: oásis] – a fertile spot in a desert where water is found.
  • novel: (noun) [Portuguese: romance] – a fictitious prose narrative of book length, typically representing character and action with some degree of realism.
  • haze: (verb) [Portuguese: neblina] – a slight obscuration of the lower atmosphere, typically caused by fine suspended particles.
  • to spellbound: (verb) [Portuguese: encantado] – hold the complete attention of (someone) as though by magic; fascinate.
  • prism: (noun) [Portuguese: prisma] – a solid geometric figure whose two end faces are similar, equal, and parallel rectilinear figures, and whose sides are parallelograms.
  • pale: (adjective) [Portuguese: pálido] – light in colour or having little colour.
  • slight: (verb) [Portuguese: leve] –  small in degree; inconsiderable.
  • to drizzle: (verb) [Portuguese: chuviscar] – rain lightly.
  • downpour: (noun) [Portuguese: aguaceiro] – a heavy rainfall.
  • wizard: (noun) [Portuguese: feiticeiro] – a man who has magical powers, especially in legends and fairy tales.
  • awesome: (adjective) [Portuguese: impressionante] – extremely impressive or daunting; inspiring great admiration, apprehension, or fear.
  • liar: (noun) [Portuguese: mentiroso] – a person who tells lies.
  • to hang out with: (phrasal verb) [Portuguese: sair com] – to spend time with (someone) socialising or having fun.
  • cast: (noun) [Portuguese: elenco] – a group of people who make up the performers in a play or film.
  • plot: (noun) [Portuguese: enredo] – the main events of a play, novel, movie, or similar work, devised and presented by the writer as an interrelated sequence.
  • mugger: (noun) [Portuguese: assaltante] – a person who attacks and robs another in a public place.
  • umbrella: (noun) [Portuguese: guarda-chuva] – a device consisting of a circular canopy of cloth on a folding metal frame supported by a central rod, used as protection against rain or sometimes sun.
  • to flirt: (verb) [Portuguese: flertar] – behave as though attracted to or trying to attract someone, but for amusement rather than with serious intentions.
  • creepy: (adjective) [Portuguese: arrepiante] – causing an unpleasant feeling of fear or unease.
  • suit: (noun) [Portuguese: terno] – a set of outer clothes made of the same fabric and designed to be worn together, typically consisting of a jacket and trousers or a jacket and skirt.
  • bad breath: (noun) [Portuguese: mal hálito] – unpleasant-smelling breath; halitosis.
  • gravel: (noun) [Portuguese: cascalho] – a loose aggregation of small water-worn or pounded stones.
  • heater: (noun) [Portuguese: aquecedor] – a person or thing that heats, in particular a device for warming the air or water.
  • WTF? (What the fuck?): (expression) [Portuguese: WTF?] – used as an expression of incredulity or annoyance.
  • underpants: (noun) [Portuguese: cuecas] – an undergarment covering the lower part of the torso and having two holes for the legs.
  • single mother: (noun) [Portuguese: mãe solteira] – a mother who raises her children alone.
  • to joke: (verb) [Portuguese: zoar] – make jokes; talk humorously or flippantly.
  • black belt: (verb) [Portuguese: cinto preto] – a black belt worn by an expert in judo, karate, and other martial arts.
  • to get drunk: (verb) [Portuguese: ficar bêbado] – to consume alcohol to the extent of losing control of one's faculties or behaviour.
     

GRAMMATICAL TERMS

  • idiom: (noun) [Portuguese: idioma] – a group of words established by usage as having a meaning not deducible from those of the individual words (e.g., rain cats and dogssee the light ).
  • direct object: [Portuguese: objeto direto] – a noun phrase denoting a person or thing that is the recipient of the action of a transitive verb, for example ‘the dog’ in ‘Jimmy fed the dog’.
  • indirect object: [Portuguese: objeto indireto] – a noun phrase referring to someone or something that is affected by the action of a transitive verb (typically as a recipient), but is not the primary object (e.g., him in give him the book ).
  • transitive verb: [Portuguese: verbo transitivo] – is a verb that can take a direct object. In other words, the verb is done to someone or something. Most verbs are transitive.
  • intransitive verb: [Portuguese: verbo intransitivo] – A verb that does not need a direct object to complete its meaning. Run, sleep, travel, wonder, and die are all intransitive verbs. Note: Some verbs can be intransitive in one sentence and transitive in another.
  • pronoun: (noun) [Portuguese: pronome] – a word that can function by itself as a noun phrase and that refers either to the participants in the discourse (e.g., I , you ) or to someone or something mentioned elsewhere in the discourse (e.g., she , it , this ).


LINKS