COFFEE

Coffee---how-the-world-became-addicted-poster-1200px.jpg

COFFEE: HOW THE WORLD BECAME ADDICTED


INTRODUCTION
Coffee addicts, coffee farmers, coffee hipsters and coffee connoisseurs are just some of the characters we will be discussing in this coffee-fuelled workshop. From the finest speciality coffee to an ordinary cuppa Joe - discover the history, economics and philosophy of how coffee culture changed the world. Let's talk coffee!
 

FIVE COFFEE FACTS
* FACT 1: The world record for the most coffee consumed by one person is 82 cups in 7 hours. (The lethal dose of coffee for an adult is about 100 cups).

* FACT 2: Finland has the highest coffee consumption rate in the world with 1,252 cups consumed per person annually. Followed by Sweden, Netherlands, Germany and Norway.

* FACT 3: Everyday, around the world more than 2.25 billion cups of coffee are consumed, which is equal to 242 Olympic swimming pools.

* FACT 4: The world’s first drip filter paper was invented by a German housewife in 1908 using her son’s notebook.

* FACT 5: The world’s strongest coffee is called ‘Death Wish Coffee’ and contains 200% more caffeine than a normal cup. [1]


ORIGINS - WHO DISCOVERED COFFEE?
Legend has it there was a goat herder named Kaldi in Ethiopia during the 9th Century. Kaldi noticed that his goats would frolic after eating the red berries from a coffee tree. He wondered why the berries turned them into ‘dancing goats’, so he tasted the berries himself and began to feel energized and happy. He took the berries to the monastery to share with the monks. But the monks did not approve and threw the berries into the fire. Soon the aroma from the coffee started to fascinate the monks and they could not resist the smell of roasted coffee. They collected the roasted coffee beans from the fire, ground them up and dissolved them in hot water. This is how coffee was discovered according to legend. [2]


SPECIES & VARIETIES
Nobody knows exactly how many there are, but to date, around 124 species of Coffea (coffee tree) have been identified. The most common coffee species are known as Arabica and Robusta, which represent 99% of production worldwide. Robusta makes up 30% of global production and is mainly used for instant coffees.

Arabica beans tend to have a sweeter, softer taste, with tones of......

 

*** THIS IS ONLY THE BEGINNING OF THE COFFEE WORKSHOP! IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO EXPERIENCE THIS CONVERSATION WORKSHOP IN FULL, WITH A GLASS OF WINE AND A FRIENDLY GROUP OF PEOPLE, THEN PLEASE CONTACT US TO FIND OUT HOW TO PARTICIPATE. 
 

The rest of this workshop will discuss...

  • HOW COFFEE COLONIZED THE WORLD
  • ECONOMICS OF COFFEE
  • WHY DOES COFFEE KEEP US AWAKE?
  • WHY BEING A COFFEE ADDICT COULD BE HEALTHY
  • BIGGEST THREATS TO COFFEE
  • SINGLE ORIGINS VS BLENDS
  • CUP OF EXCELLENCE
  • COFFEE HIPSTERS
  • THE DARK SIDE OF COFFEE
  • BLACK IVORY COFFEE
  • GOOD PLACES TO DRINK SPECIALITY COFFEE

QUESTION

How much coffee is too much coffee for you?
Please let us know by leaving a response in the comment section below.

 

VOCABULARY

  • coffee: (noun) [Portuguese: café] - a drink made from the roasted and ground beanlike seeds of a tropical shrub, served hot or iced.
  • addict: (noun) [Portuguese: viciado] - a person who is addicted to a particular substance, typically an illegal drug.
  • legend: (noun) [Portuguese: lenda] - a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical but unauthenticated.
  • goat: (noun) [Portuguese: bode] - a hardy domesticated ruminant animal that has backward curving horns and (in the male) a beard. It is kept for its milk and meat and is noted for its lively and frisky behaviour.
  • herder: (noun) [Portuguese: pastor] - a person who looks after a herd of livestock or makes a living from keeping livestock, especially in open country.
  • to frolic: (verb) [Portuguese: brincar] -  (of an animal or person) play and move about cheerfully, excitedly, or energetically.
  • monastery: (noun) [Portuguese: Mosteiro] - a building or buildings occupied by a community of monks living under religious vows.
  • monk: (noun) [Portuguese: monge] - a member of a religious community of men typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.
  • sweeter: (adjective) [Portuguese: mais doce] - having the pleasant taste characteristic of sugar or honey; not salty, sour, or bitter.
  • harsher: (adjective) [Portuguese: mais duras] - unpleasantly rough or jarring to the senses.
  • peanut: (noun) [Portuguese: amendoim] - the oval seed of a South American plant, widely roasted and salted and eaten as a snack.
  • slavery: (noun) [Portuguese: escravidão] - the state of being a slave.
  • to grind: (verb) [Portuguese: moer] - reduce (something) to small particles or powder by crushing it.
  • to roast: (verb) [Portuguese: assar] - cook (food, especially meat) by prolonged exposure to heat in an oven or over a fire.
  • seedlings: (noun) [Portuguese: mudas] - a young plant, especially one raised from seed and not from a cutting.
  • bouquet: (noun) [Portuguese: ramalhete] - an attractively arranged bunch of flowers, especially one presented as a gift or carried at a ceremony.
  • to trigger: (noun) [Portuguese: gatilhar] - cause (an event or situation) to happen or exist.
  • rust: (noun) [Portuguese: ferrugem] - a reddish- or yellowish-brown flaky coating of iron oxide that is formed on iron or steel by oxidation, especially in the presence of moisture.
  • climate change: (noun) [Portuguese: Mudanças Climaticas] - a change in global or regional climate patterns, in particular a change apparent from the mid to late 20th century onwards and attributed largely to the increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide produced by the use of fossil fuels.
  • gloomy: (adjective) [Portuguese: sombrio] - dark or poorly lit, especially so as to appear depressing or frightening.
  • cuppa Joe: A cup of coffee. The term originates from former U.S. Navy Secretary Josephus Daniels; when Daniels banned alcohol from Navy vessels, soldiers instead drank coffee and grudgingly came up with the term.
  • hipster: (noun) - a person who follows the latest trends and fashions, especially those regarded as being outside the cultural mainstream.
  • affluent: (adjective) [Portuguese: afluente] - (especially of a group or area) having a great deal of money; wealthy.
  • gentrify: (verb) [Portuguese: gentrificar] - renovate and improve (especially a house or district) so that it conforms to middle-class taste.
  • macchiato: (noun) - espresso with a dash of frothy steamed milk.
  • pretentious: (adjective) [Portuguese: pretensioso] - attempting to impress by affecting greater importance, talent, culture, etc., than is actually possessed.
  • to smuggle: (verb) [Portuguese: contrabandear] - move (goods) illegally into or out of a country.
  • threat: (noun) [Portuguese: ameaça] - a statement of an intention to inflict pain, injury, damage, or other hostile action on someone in retribution for something done or not done.
  • dung: (noun) [Portuguese: estrume] - the excrement of animals; manure.
  • poo: (noun) [Portuguese: cocô] – excrement or faeces

REFERENCES

  1. I Love Coffee” Iwata, Ryoko, ilovecoofe.jp
  2. “Coffee Obsessions” Moldvaer, Anette, 2014, DK
  3. “Uncommon Grounds, The history of coffee and how it transformed the world” Pendergrast, Mark, 2012, Basic Books
  4. “9 Ways Science Justifies Your Coffee Addiction” Wise, Abigail, realsimple.com
  5. “The Last Drop? Climate Change May Raise Coffee Prices, Lower Quality” Fiegl, Amanda, 2012, National Geographic
  6. “Coffee Production Effects on Child Labor and Schooling in Rural Brazil.” Kruger, D. I., 2007, Journal of Development Economics, 82(2), 448-463.
  7. “Coffee Labor’s Daily Grind” September 2016, Justice Network
  8. “The World’s most expensive coffee is made from elephant poop” Jaccoma, Gianni, June 2015, Thrillist

EXTRA SOURCES

 

© COPYRIGHT 2016 JAMES WJ SUTTON & ESTÚDIO447 ENGLISH CLUB

** SE VOCÊ GOSTARIA DE USAR O CONTEÚDO DESTE OU QUALQUER OUTRO BLOG POST/ WORKSHOP FAVOR ENTRAR EM CONTATO COM JAMES SUTTON PELO EMAIL JAMES(AT)ESTUDIO447.NET