THE ANONYMOUS WORKSHOP

Anonymous - Workshop de Inglês - Estúdio447

THE ANONYMOUS WORKSHOP

* In this workshop we will look at what it means to be anonymous. We will discuss the infamous hacker and activist group known as Anonymous along with artists such as Daft Punk and Banksy who successfully use anonymity to their advantage.


INTRODUCTION
The 21st Century and the spread of the Internet has not fundamentally changed what it means to be Anonymous, but it has taken it to another level. Many accept the loss of privacy as necessary for state security or an inevitable consequence of everyone having a smart phone in their hand, posting pictures of you on Facebook. Though a few go to great lengths to remain hidden. In this workshop we will begin by discussing the online hacker and activist group Anonymous. Examining their origins, how they attack big banks, corporations, governments, the Church of Scientology, ISIS and even Donald Trump! We will also explore the wider concept of anonymity and how artists such as Daft Punk and Banksy have used it to their advantage. Let’s discuss what does it mean to be anonymous today!


ANONYMOUS
Anonymous is an international network of activists and hackers, commonly referred to as hacktivists. They describe themselves as having “a very loose and decentralized command structure that operates on ideas rather than directives”.[1] Anonymous has been described as a classic “do-ocracy”. As the term implies, that means rule by sheer doing: Individuals propose actions, others join in (or not), and then the Anonymous flag is flown over the result. There’s no one to grant permission, no promise of praise or credit, so every action must be its own reward.[2]

Much like we cannot describe modern day terrorist groups like Al-Qaeda or ISIS (The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) as a single group of people all working in constant communication to coordinate their attacks, Anonymous is best thought of in a similar way - as a philosophy that anyone can choose to embody and become a part of. Anonymous claims to have no leaders and yet boasts that its participants are so innumerable that no ten or hundred or thousand arrests could ever stop it. As one of their famously used slogans states “We are Legion”.[3]


ANONYMOUS ORIGINS
Anonymous originated in 2003 on the website 4chan. This is a place where people can post content anonymously about a wide variety of Internet subcultures. Anonymous members (known as “Anons”) can be distinguished in public by wearing Guy Fawkes masks in the style portrayed in the graphic novel and film V for Vendetta.[4] In the beginning Anonymous would carry out hacks just for entertainment or “lulz” as they like to say. A ‘lulz’ is a variant of ‘LOL’ (Laugh out Loud), but more specifically used to denote laughter at someone who is the victim of a prank.


PROJECT CHANOLOGY
Anonymous first became associated with hacktivism in 2008, following a series of actions against the Church of Scientology, which became known as Project Chanology. It all began when the gossip blog Gawker uploaded a video in which celebrity Scientologist Tom Cruise praised the religion. The church, which routinely attacks anyone who criticises them, responded by trying to sue the Gawker for copyright infringement. Anonymous organised their own attack against the church in retaliation, pranking its hotline and hacking its website.[5]  

A group of Anons uploaded a YouTube video in which....

 

*** THIS IS ONLY THE BEGINNING OF THE ANONYMOUS WORKSHOP! IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO EXPERIENCE THIS CONVERSATION WORKSHOP IN FULL, WITH A GLASS OF WINE AND A FRIENDLY GROUP OF PEOPLE, THEN PLEASE CONTACT US TO FIND OUT HOW TO PARTICIPATE. 

The rest of this workshop will discuss...

  • OPERATION PAYBACK
  • MASTERCARD, VISA & PAYPAL
  • OPERATION TUNISIA
  • HACKING WARS
  • ANONYMOUS ATTACKS GAY HATE
  • OP ISIS
  • OP TRUMP
  • ARRESTING ANONYMOUS
  • TERRORISTS OR FREEDOM FIGHTERS
  • SUPER-CONSCIOUSNESS
  • THE ANONYMOUS ARTISTS
  • ANONYMITY ONLINE
     

© COPYRIGHT 2016 JAMES WJ SUTTON & ESTÚDIO447 ENGLISH CLUB

VOCABULARY

  • to go to great lengths: (expression) – to go to a lot of effort
  • to embody: (verb) [Portuguese: encanar] - be an expression of or give a tangible or visible form to (an idea, quality, or feeling).
  • boasts: (noun) [Portuguese: gaba] - an act of talking with excessive pride and self-satisfaction.
  • anonymity: (noun) [Portuguese: anonimato] - is when an individual’s identity is unknown.
  • legion: (noun) [Portuguese: legião] - a vast host, multitude, or number of people or things.
  • capital punishment: (noun) [Portuguese: pena de morte] - the legally authorized killing of someone as punishment for a crime.
  • portray: [Portuguese: retratar] – to depict (someone or something) in a work of art or literature.
  • hacktivist: (noun) - a computer hacker whose activity is aimed at promoting a social or political cause.
  • to praise: (verb) [Portuguese: louvor] – to express warm approval or admiration of.
  • prank: (noun) [Portuguese: brincadeira] - a practical joke or mischievous act.
  • to hack: (verb) [Portuguese: hackear] - use a computer to gain unauthorized access to data in a system.
  • outrage: (noun) [Portuguese: ultraje] - an extremely strong reaction of anger, shock, or indignation.
  • barely: (adverb) [Portuguese: mal] - only just; almost not.
  • merciless: (adjective) [Portuguese: impiedoso] - showing no mercy or pity.
  • inaccuracies: (noun) [Portuguese: imprecisões] - the quality or state of not being accurate.
  • fag: (noun) - a male homosexual.
  • censorship: (noun) [Portuguese: censura] - the practice of officially examining books, movies, etc., and suppressing unacceptable parts.
  • prosecutions: (noun) [Portuguese: processos] - the institution and conducting of legal proceedings against someone in respect of a criminal charge.
  • martyr: (noun) [Portuguese: mártir] - a person who is killed because of their religious or other beliefs.
  • lynch-mob: (noun) [Portuguese: linchamento] - a band of people intent on lynching someone.
  • to deny: (verb) [Portuguese: negar] - state that one refuses to admit the truth or existence of.
  • hive: (noun) beehive – [Portuguese: colmeia]
  • helmet: (noun) [Portuguese: capacete] - a hard or padded protective hat.
  • to witness: (verb) [Portuguese: testemunha] – to see (an event, typically a crime or accident) take place.
  • pointless: (adjective) [Portuguese: sem sentido] - having little or no sense, use, or purpose.
  • hurtful: (adjective) [Portuguese: prejudicial] - causing distress to someone's feelings.

EXTRA HACKER & ANONYMOUS VOCABULARY

  • Denial-of-service (DoS) attack: is an attempt to make a machine or network unavailable to its intended users, such as to temporarily or indefinitely interrupt services of a host connected to the Internet. It is a relatively simple technique used by hackers to take down a website.
  • Guy Fawkes: was a member of a group of provincial English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605 to assassinate King James I and restore a Catholic monarch to the throne. His effigy is traditionally burned on a bonfire every 5th November in the UK, commonly accompanied by a fireworks display. Guy Fawkes is famously associated with anarchy and taking down the government power. 
  • The Church of Scientology: is a new religion that was created by science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard. It is considered by its critics to be dangerous cult.
  • ISIS: The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria - also known as (ISIL) The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.
  • V for Vendetta: A film that shows an anarchist revolutionary battling a totalitarian government.

SOURCES

  1.  Anonymous Documentary: How Anonymous Hackers Changed the World Full Documentary
  2.  Wikipedia: Anonymous (Group)
  3.  WIRED – Quinn Norton – 2012: How Anonymous Picks Targets, Launches Attacks, and Takes Powerful Organizations Down
  4. The Telegraph - Bernadette McNulty – 2007:  Daft Punk: Behind the robot masks

VIDEO SOURCES

  1.  Anonymous - Message to Donald Trump June 2016
  2.  Tom Cruise Scientology (full version)
  3.  Donald Trump 'Anonymous' Declares Cyber War on Trump
  4.  Anonymous - Change the world with us (subtitled)
  5.  Daft Punk | Random Access Memories | The Collaborators: Pharrell Williams

REFERENCES

  1.  Kelly, Brian (2012). "Investing in a Centralized Cybersecurity Infrastructure: Why 'Hacktivism' can and should influence cybersecurity reform" (PDF). Boston University Law Review 92 (5): 1663–1710. Retrieved May 2, 2013.
  2.  Norton, Quinn (2012). “How Anonymous Picks Targets, Launches Attacks, and Takes Powerful Organizations Down” Article. WIRED
  3.  ^ Norton 2012
  4.  Waites, Rosie (October 20, 2011). "V for Vendetta masks: Who". BBC News. Retrieved October 20, 2011
  5.  Olson, Parmy (June 5, 2012). We Are Anonymous: Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec, Anonymous, and the Global Cyber Insurgency. Hachette Digital, Inc. ISBN 978-0-316-21353-0. Retrieved May 2, 2013.
  6.  Olson 2012, pp. 71–72.
  7.  "Scientology faces wave of cyber attacks". Cape Times.  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). March 4, 2008. Retrieved May 2, 2013.
  8. ^ Norton 2012
  9. "Activists target recording industry websites". BBC News. September 20, 2010. Retrieved October 27, 2010.
  10.  Olson 2012, p. 103.
  11.  "Anonymous hacktivists say Wikileaks war to continue". BBC News. December 9, 2010. Archived from the original on May 3, 2013. Retrieved May 3, 2013.
  12.  ^ Norton 2012
  13.  ^ Olson 2012, pp. 122, 129.
  14.  ^ Norton 2012
  15.  ^ Norton 2012
  16.  ^ Olson 2012, pp. 176–77.
  17. "Anonymous vows to ‘destroy’ Westboro Baptist Church over Sandy Hook picket plans". The Raw Story. December 17, 2012. Archived from the original on May 5, 2013. Retrieved May 5, 2013.
  18. "Hacktivists strike Westboro Baptist Church over Newtown tragedy". RT. December 17, 2012. Archived from the original on May 5, 2013. Retrieved May 5, 2013.
  19. "Uganda prime minister hacked 'over gay rights'". BBC News. August 16, 2012. Archived from the original on May 5, 2013. Retrieved May 5, 2013.
  20. "Ghost Security Hackers, Offshoot Of 'Anonymous,' Claim They Disrupted ISIS Attack By Intercepting Twitter Messages". International Business Times. Retrieved 2015-11-15.
  21. "Anonymous declares war over Charlie Hebdo attack". CNN Money. 9 January 2015.
  22. Newsbeat (9 January 2015). "Anonymous hackers 'declare war' on jihadists after France attacks". BBC. BBC News. Retrieved 16 January 2015.
  23. http://europe.newsweek.com/anonymous-hackers-declare-total-war-donald-trump-april-fools-day-437027
  24. "Anonymous - Elucidating #OpISIS and #OpTrump". YouTube. Retrieved 31 March 2016.
  25. Olson 2012, p. 355.
  26. Olson 2012, p. 356.
  27. ^ Norton 2012
  28. Coleman, Gabriella (April 6, 2011). "Anonymous: From the Lulz to Collective Action". Archived from the original on May 5, 2013. Retrieved May 5, 2013.
  29. Rawlinson, Kevin; Peachey, Paul (April 13, 2012). "Hackers step up war on security services". The Independent.  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved May 5, 2013.
  30. Carter, Adam (March 15, 2013). "From Anonymous to shuttered websites, the evolution of online protest". CBC News. Archived from the original on May 6, 2013. Retrieved May 6, 2013.
  31. Gellman, Barton (April 18, 2012). "The 100 Most Influential People In The World". Time.
  32. Caneppele, Stefano; Calderoni, Francesco. "420chan"&hl=en Organized Crime, Corruption and Crime Prevention. p. 235. ISBN 978-3-319-01839-3. Retrieved 28 March 2015.
  33. McNulty, Bernadette (17 November 2007). "Daft Punk: Behind the robot masks". The Telegraph. Retrieved 14 October 2012.

 

© COPYRIGHT 2016 JAMES WJ SUTTON & ESTÚDIO447 ENGLISH CLUB

** SE VOCÊ GOSTARIA DE USAR O CONTEÚDO DESTE OU QUALQUER OUTRO BLOG POST/ WORKSHOP FAVOR ENTRAR EM CONTATO COM JAMES SUTTON PELO EMAIL JAMES(AT)ESTUDIO447.NET

 
 
The Anonymous Workshop - Estúdio447 English Club